Making the most of the Wolds.

The Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust states in their Winter 2021 Lapwings magazine : “Bigger, more robust, nature reserves will be better able to withstand the effects of climate change and if we can  link them into a coherent network, we will allow species to move across the landscape better and prevent fragmentation and isolation of vulnerable […]

The River Lymn and its Tributaries.

The small streams that come together to form the River Lymn run down from the hills west of Tetford. They pass through the village as a fast flowing stream which at this stage is the very epitome of Tennyson’s brook. Particularly just past Tetford watermill it babbles over rocks and roots as it hurries through […]

Gone is “All the land in flowery squares”.

All the land in flowery squares, This is a line from Tennyson’s The Gardener’s Daughter a relatively early poem by the bard. It is referring to the countryside in May, which he was familiar with while growing up in Lymndale. The squares are small hedged fields filled with meadow flowers and much more. After then […]

Widening the Wolds

Although the Lincolnshire Wolds AONB stretches some 50 kilometres from north to south (Caistor to Gunby)  the distance across it south of Louth is as little as 11 kilometres. North of Claxby St. Andrew  the eastern boundary follows close to the line of the 50 metres contour, which overlooks the marsh up to Little Cawthorpe. […]

Somersby and Bag Enderby.

The two villages  of Somersby and Bag Enderby  tucked away in the middle of Hill Wapentake essentially form a single unit and two hundred years ago were ministered as one by Tennyson’s father Dr. George Clayton Tennyson. They are separated from the rest of the Wolds by distinct physical boundaries with the steep red chalk […]